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Posts from the ‘Saori’ Category

The tale of a warp

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Counting!

Learning to create your own warps has always been an integral part of the weaving process. And although the Saori looms have the unique pre-wound warps, there may come a day when you just need your own mix of colours, styles of yarn or different texture. Some people find the whole process meditative and Saori has some equipment that offers some more comfortable ways of building the warp and preparing for weaving. I’ve written an overview of the four different approaches and the equipment needed for each of them here. Read more

Look, feel, hold and wrap

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“I wove it”

This weekend was full of the clacking of shuttles once again. Here Lydia is a 2nd time weaver to the studio. Following on from the theme of wider cloths on the loom, she took the opportunity to weave a full wrap. In two very full days of weaving she wove over two metres of fine and detailed work in wool.

When a cloth is cut down off the loom there is something about just looking and looking at whats been woven. Even though we can regularly unroll and see our work it is mostly hidden on that cloth beam providing a memory that doesn’t really reveal itself totally until we can hold it, look at it, feel it and wrap ourselves in it.  The tape measure was a popular workshop tool too, with a regular measure to keep the weavers on track to completion.  It is worth it to keep weaving to get a decent wrap around for our bodies rather than leaving it too short. A great project and achievement on the loom.

Together Lydia and Jan worked a long two days to finish their projects in studio time. I feel that every time I write about a workshop I’m full of gushing cliques.  The dictionary meaning of gushing is “ (of speech or writing) effusive or exaggeratedly enthusiastic.”  Never am I exaggerating my enthusiasm for woven work or for the weavers I encounter.  I’ll let the photos speak for themselves.

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Jans woven cloth on the loom jansweave

A workshop with firsts

Emily's weaveSadly another workshop is over. The energy of the studio is now up to me! Such enjoyable company and such difference in the weavers and their styles on the loom. It was also a workshop of firsts. Read more

When you have to have predictability

colourandweaveThere are times when incidental asymmetry in my weaving starts to erode into my imagined feelings of control over things we do and experience in life.  So I’ve recently set up my loom to do some ordered and predicable work, knowing that the more free style ideas will then push themselves to the fore. The Saori loom can do all manner of weaving and it might be of interest to new weavers that have come to weaving through Saori that the loom can be used for any type of conventional cloth weaving.

Colour and weave work is really fascinating.  I’ve got Ann Sutton’s book (Color and Weave Design) with seemingly every different mix of effects which I’ve always gravitated to. So I set up one of the Saori inside sets with a black and white colour and weave, framed with the red to square it all off.  It’s a common design. It uses only two shafts but the patterning comes from the order of the colours used.  This example is woven in 2/22 cottolin sett at 10 epc. This means threading two ends through each dent in the reed (size 5dpc) rather than one. So it gives a balanced weave and the warp is closer than the usual sett in Saori style weaving.  It’s also a good idea, perhaps, to tie the warp ends onto the front rod as the clipping rod may not be sufficient to hold the larger number of threads at times. I have used the clipping rod here but there may be times when you can just tie it on. Read more

#Whyiloveweaving

You’ll notice the hashtag # in the header. It means ‘alert’ to humans and ‘sort’ and ‘curate’ to the bots, all in one little hash.  Even though the trend in writing everywhere is to to shorten everything, leading to confusion at times, IMHO. We’ve now come to saying the word ‘hashtag’ before announcing something either comedic or ironic but always more seriously in written form on social media. And yes, #Iloveweaving so a totally valid hashtag use. Check it out on Instagram.

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Jo and Freya in the studio

‘Teaching’ others to share my lifelong love of the interlacing of threads is another huge, #megabeyondhuge, indulgence and privilege for me. In the studio, I and I hope others can have just that brief space to think about cloth and its creation, how its human history of making, using and experience is part of us and we can participate, dabble or run in its journey onwards, still.   A brief space to connect, feel connected and not cast afloat as many of us feel in our daily lives. I know this is a theme of weaving everywhere, like music, it can really sustain a person creatively.

As I add to the Australian textile historic links I’ve found lots of older photos in the archives of state libraries which make me wonder about the people pictured. Their situations, what happened to them, why they were there that particular day etc.  These black and white and sepia photos always look mysterious. They make you look deeper into the photo rather than accepting the image so quickly.  You’ll see here a little experiment where, at a click of a mouse, the software bots and algorithms in Photoshop turned the image into the past with sepia and it too creates a little world of wonder like the old photos in the archives. Somehow cementing its authority of the moment.

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A photo now

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A photo floating into the past

The day when Jo and Freya came had us warping, weaving and keeping cool in the heat.  Jo also took home a lovely wall drape in the WWW technique. We can’t get enough of that. Read more

Bias. What’s not to like?

biastowear2Indeed. The Bias to Wear workshop is now over but I leave you with a few photos of the great afternoon.  This bias technique for clothing was one I learnt recently at Saori in Japan. Its beauty isn’t the fact that you can make bias clothing, of course you can in many ways. For me it’s the calculation of the length of fabric needed based on your woven fabric width and the easy process to begin building the bias ‘blank’. This builds the initial form with no wastage or fancy scissor work.

From this point the magic of styling and designing can begin in your own way.  Narrow cloth or wide the stitching works in the same way every time. For example a bias ‘blank’ for a poncho style of garment will require 3.62 metres of cloth in a woven finished width of 28cms. After working that calc  you can relax into the weaving like with assurance about the woven length you’ll need.

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We all had a bit of fun stitching a small hat sized bias ‘blank’ in calico to get the idea.

We reviewed how to stitch up the seams on our handwovens to keep away the frays and CUT the fabric. Yes, cutting is part of it, you need armholes and neck openings even if you don’t cut off any fabric in the process.

What can you make. Well anything. Tops, jackets, dresses, pants, skirts, hats and even bags. Bias cut just makes everything drape and fit better and angles the fabric to make stripes diagonals rather than vertical or horizontal.

bias2Although it was a short two hour workshop I think we covered a very good start and what better way to spend a Saturday afternoon than thinking about clothing and weaving, designing cutting and sharing experiences together. Thank you to Dominique, Susie, Emily, Marilyn and Michelle.bias4bias1

People need people…and looms

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An organic woven cloth with elements of ‘life’ by Laura

Over the past few months I’ve offered special Saori intro sessions and greeted many new weavers in private workshops. With the new year approaching I feel like it’s a good time to wrap up 2016 and get onto the 2017. There is always a hopeful, new start feel to the new year.

I see life running through the weaving of my customers and visitors to the studio. In some small (or big) way, weaving and craft provides, at the very least, a meaningful, productive distraction or a boost to our energy and confidence. Either way it’s enjoyable.

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Finishing the cloth

Here are some photos of weaving happiness over the last few weeks.

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Helen’s weave

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Robyn’s weave

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Robyn’s weave

Happy Christmas and a happy new year to all.I hope to welcome many more weave lovers to the studio in 2017.

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Designing directly on the loom

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Roslyn’s weave

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Laura’s weave

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Dominique’s wave weaving

Workshop buzz

Deb's woven beanieThis weekend saw the end of another fantastic workshop in the studio here at Old Bar. It’s always a bit lonely going back to my empty studio after such a flurry of creative energy…but then I have all that yarn to get weaving with!

Deb is the co-chair for the Alice Springs Beanie Festival. A distinctly and uniquely Australian invention which has that wildfire effect on everyone who encounters it. So, of course, she wove a beanie and it was stitched with the new Saori bias technique. Such a versatile and easy sewing technique for all sorts of clothing and beanies.  See mini workshop details for January.

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