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Posts from the ‘Workshops’ Category

Morisset Weaving

Morisset WeaversLast month I had the pleasure of being with Saori weavers at Morisset Spinners and Weavers in NSW.  A few of the weavers had already ‘caught’ my Saori addiction and the cloth discoveries were so interesting.  Two full days of weaving and getting to know each other eventuated in metres of expressive cloth destined for clothing, wall, warmth and just plain ‘looking at joy’.

Carolyn weavingHere you can see Carolyn weaving away.  Loads of shuttles and bobbins awaiting their turn through the warp.  I wonder what makes us pick up one colour or texture in preference to another??  

The Morisset weavers are a growing and particularly keen group of weavers. They seemed to lap up everything and their interests in different types of weaving are diverse.

Morisset weavers have a dedicated storeroom and a space to meet and learn weaving and spinning.  Many small places in Australia have these and I’m always heartened that handweaving opportunties survive in pockets everywhere. We’re all thirsty for hands-on craft skill learning and doing it in happy, supportive and conflict free social gatherings. Morisset is managing this well. The historical basis for these groups is the guilds system from England and although this has greatly changed in that the guilds aren’t like unions or political like in previous times, it’s spirit of teaching and passing on skills remains. This history is a very significant one and perhaps one that we don’t promote enough.  Read more

Look, feel, hold and wrap

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“I wove it”

This weekend was full of the clacking of shuttles once again. Here Lydia is a 2nd time weaver to the studio. Following on from the theme of wider cloths on the loom, she took the opportunity to weave a full wrap. In two very full days of weaving she wove over two metres of fine and detailed work in wool.

When a cloth is cut down off the loom there is something about just looking and looking at whats been woven. Even though we can regularly unroll and see our work it is mostly hidden on that cloth beam providing a memory that doesn’t really reveal itself totally until we can hold it, look at it, feel it and wrap ourselves in it.  The tape measure was a popular workshop tool too, with a regular measure to keep the weavers on track to completion.  It is worth it to keep weaving to get a decent wrap around for our bodies rather than leaving it too short. A great project and achievement on the loom.

Together Lydia and Jan worked a long two days to finish their projects in studio time. I feel that every time I write about a workshop I’m full of gushing cliques.  The dictionary meaning of gushing is “ (of speech or writing) effusive or exaggeratedly enthusiastic.”  Never am I exaggerating my enthusiasm for woven work or for the weavers I encounter.  I’ll let the photos speak for themselves.

Lydia3Lydia4lydia2janLydiaWeaving

Jans woven cloth on the loom jansweave

A workshop with firsts

Emily's weaveSadly another workshop is over. The energy of the studio is now up to me! Such enjoyable company and such difference in the weavers and their styles on the loom. It was also a workshop of firsts. Read more

#Whyiloveweaving

You’ll notice the hashtag # in the header. It means ‘alert’ to humans and ‘sort’ and ‘curate’ to the bots, all in one little hash.  Even though the trend in writing everywhere is to to shorten everything, leading to confusion at times, IMHO. We’ve now come to saying the word ‘hashtag’ before announcing something either comedic or ironic but always more seriously in written form on social media. And yes, #Iloveweaving so a totally valid hashtag use. Check it out on Instagram.

Freya's weaving

Jo and Freya in the studio

‘Teaching’ others to share my lifelong love of the interlacing of threads is another huge, #megabeyondhuge, indulgence and privilege for me. In the studio, I and I hope others can have just that brief space to think about cloth and its creation, how its human history of making, using and experience is part of us and we can participate, dabble or run in its journey onwards, still.   A brief space to connect, feel connected and not cast afloat as many of us feel in our daily lives. I know this is a theme of weaving everywhere, like music, it can really sustain a person creatively.

As I add to the Australian textile historic links I’ve found lots of older photos in the archives of state libraries which make me wonder about the people pictured. Their situations, what happened to them, why they were there that particular day etc.  These black and white and sepia photos always look mysterious. They make you look deeper into the photo rather than accepting the image so quickly.  You’ll see here a little experiment where, at a click of a mouse, the software bots and algorithms in Photoshop turned the image into the past with sepia and it too creates a little world of wonder like the old photos in the archives. Somehow cementing its authority of the moment.

Curiousweaver Studio

A photo now

Curiousweaver studio

A photo floating into the past

The day when Jo and Freya came had us warping, weaving and keeping cool in the heat.  Jo also took home a lovely wall drape in the WWW technique. We can’t get enough of that. Read more

Workshop buzz

Deb's woven beanieThis weekend saw the end of another fantastic workshop in the studio here at Old Bar. It’s always a bit lonely going back to my empty studio after such a flurry of creative energy…but then I have all that yarn to get weaving with!

Deb is the co-chair for the Alice Springs Beanie Festival. A distinctly and uniquely Australian invention which has that wildfire effect on everyone who encounters it. So, of course, she wove a beanie and it was stitched with the new Saori bias technique. Such a versatile and easy sewing technique for all sorts of clothing and beanies.  See mini workshop details for January.

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Buttony, wavy, ribby and wide weaves

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Glenda’s completed weave

Yet another magical workshop came to a close too quickly over the weekend.  Several of the participants were Sturtees and returnees.

Daisy selecting buttons

Ordering and threading the buttons

Daisy came to work on a special buttony weave which incorporated her mother’s buttons in a bed runner. Rather than stitch them onto the two metre plus cloth after weaving it, we decided to have the buttons threaded onto a warp thread which could be woven with each row and the buttons positioned as she went.

The buttons could also be positioned with the weft but I think the warp idea went better. A large shuttle full of many large buttons were a bit of a ‘danger’ in that movement usually twisted them around each other, so Daisy used a paper sleeve to protect them and the shuttle was left on top of the shelf. The buttons were stopped from falling with a little peg and just bought down as needed. She did very well indeed. Read more

Workshops without work

weaving groupAnother workshop in the weekend inspired fresh ideas in the studio. It’s like ‘there’s nothing new’- but there is, at least to me. Ruth and Anna came equipped with their own yarn ways and ready to re-purpose jewellery in their work. Diane wove a bag textile enhancing the jute textures throughout the cloth featuring pops of colours, and Sue began with a ‘ yarn dance’ for the wall but then seemed to be working towards wearable cloth as the weaving process and rhythm took over.

Just what our cloth is for is often separated from the actual weaving process in the Saori free style and sometimes accidental, serendipitous approach we take. We can’t help planning, but as we are ‘planning’ as we weave it can force us to let go of the strong desire to control the outcome. Read more

Studio time

Ellen weaving on the Saori loom

Ellen on the loom

I’ve had lots of studio visitors over the last couple of months. Aside from planned weekend workshops I’m experimenting with the viability of day sessions now and again. Individual tuition is always available as many people want to know more about how to warp and use the loom for their own work. But it’s always nice to have a buzzing studio with everyone sharing their ‘discoveries’ and weaving together.

You’ll see lots of work ‘on loom’ but there is a feeling of elation and surprise when the cloth is cut down.  But this is only the first in a set of steps to make the cloth and the finishing process really gets it all together.

Nikita weaving cloth

Nikita translucent cloth design

Handwoven cloth

Megan’s rich color cloth

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